(Vienna)

  • New
Reference: S20685
Author Jacopo FORESTI
Year: 1513 ca.
Zone: Wien
Printed: Venice
Measures: 113 x 90 mm
€175.00

  • New
Reference: S20685
Author Jacopo FORESTI
Year: 1513 ca.
Zone: Wien
Printed: Venice
Measures: 113 x 90 mm
€175.00

Description

An imaginary view of the city, from the Supplementum chronicarum orbis ab initio mundi.

Giacomo Filippo di Bergamo (1434-1520), of the Foresti family, was an Augustin hermit and author of Confessionale and De claris mulieribus. His works have been published for the fist time in Venice in 1483.

The first Italian edition, from which the present example is taken, was published in 1535. Woodcut, fine later hand colour, good condition.

Jacopo FORESTI (Bergamo 1434 - 1520)

Giacomo Filippo Foresti da Bergamo was an Augustinian monk, known as the author of several significant early printed works. He was a chronicler and Biblical scholar. His Supplementum chronicarum (first printed at Venice, 1483) was a supplement to the usual universal chronicle; it ran to numerous subsequent editions. Though it mixes mythological figures, treated euhemeristically as historical ones, on an equal footing with Christian cultural heroes, with additional chapters on the Sibyls and the Trojan War, amongst other things, it records Giovanni da Carignano's lost work on papal contacts at Avignon in 1306 with Ethiopian visitors. His De claris mulieribus updated the work of Boccaccio of the same title. It was dedicated to Beatrice of Aragon. This book, as well as the Supplementum, influenced many subsequent publications He also wrote a well-known confessional.

Jacopo FORESTI (Bergamo 1434 - 1520)

Giacomo Filippo Foresti da Bergamo was an Augustinian monk, known as the author of several significant early printed works. He was a chronicler and Biblical scholar. His Supplementum chronicarum (first printed at Venice, 1483) was a supplement to the usual universal chronicle; it ran to numerous subsequent editions. Though it mixes mythological figures, treated euhemeristically as historical ones, on an equal footing with Christian cultural heroes, with additional chapters on the Sibyls and the Trojan War, amongst other things, it records Giovanni da Carignano's lost work on papal contacts at Avignon in 1306 with Ethiopian visitors. His De claris mulieribus updated the work of Boccaccio of the same title. It was dedicated to Beatrice of Aragon. This book, as well as the Supplementum, influenced many subsequent publications He also wrote a well-known confessional.