Veduta di una Parte del Campidoglio / Veue d'une partie du Capitol

Reference: S41509
Author Israel SILVESTRE
Year: 1645 ca.
Zone: Campidoglio
Printed: Paris
Measures: 250 x 120 mm
€250.00

Reference: S41509
Author Israel SILVESTRE
Year: 1645 ca.
Zone: Campidoglio
Printed: Paris
Measures: 250 x 120 mm
€250.00

Description

View taken from the series Vues d'Italie.

Silvestre, engraver and draftsman, was born in Nancy in 1621. As was customary at the time, he made several trips to Italy to copy the old masters and to improve his skills with the greatest masters. Faucheux fixes the dates of these trips, the first before 1640 (Israel was not yet 20 years old), the second from 1643 to 1644 and the last around 1653. Israel brought with him many views of Italy, almost all of them engraved. Until 1659, he made other trips to France and Lorraine, from which he took many drawings and engravings.

His style was, at the beginning, rather loose, but from 1643 onwards became more refined and delicate, acquiring accuracy and precision without being dry, resulting sometimes similar to that of Jacques Callot or Stefano della Bella, with whom he had friendly relations through his maternal uncle and mentor, the publisher Israël Henriet. Alongside the testimonies to ancient Rome, he soon showed great interest in the "modern" city, becoming one of the precursors of vedutism - not only in the field of engraving - anticipating artists such as Lievin Cruyl and Gaspar van Wittel.

It is impossible here to make a complete inventory of Israël Silvestre's works, so prolific was the artist. He left numerous drawings and more than a thousand engravings (see Faucheux Catalogue raisonné de toutes les estampes qui forment l'œuvre d'I.S.). However, among his most beautiful works, we can mention the many complex "small" suites (composed of a few plates) on the squares, churches and antiquities of Rome.

Etching, in excellent condition.

Israel SILVESTRE (Nancy, 1621 - Parigi, 1691).

Silvestre was a French family of artists. The engraver and draughtsman Israël Silvestre was a nephew of ISRAËL HENRIET. Most of Silvestre’s children became painters, draughtsmen or engravers. His son Louis de Silvestre (the younger) was a successful painter, who worked for the Saxon court from 1716 to 1748. Louis’s brother Charles-François Silvestre (b Paris, 10 April 1667; d Versailles, 8 Feb 1738) was a painter, draughtsman and engraver. Louis Silvestre (the elder) (b Paris, 20 March 1669; d Paris, 18 April 1740) was a painter and engraver, and both Alexandre Silvestre (b Paris, 26 Dec 1672) and Suzanne Silvestre (b Paris, 14 June 1694; d before 1738) were engravers. Suzanne married the sculptor Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne the elder. (b Nancy, 3 Aug 1621; d Paris, 11 Oct 1691). Engraver and draughtsman. About 1634 or 1635 he arrived in Paris, where his uncle Israël Henriet taught him to draw and engrave and published his prints. Between 1638 and 1641 Silvestre travelled in Italy; records show that he was there again c. 1643 and in 1653. After the second visit, his Vues d’Italie appeared, followed by Vues de Paris et des environs (1645); Ports de mer (1648); Paysages (1654); a second set of Vues d’Italie and prints of the Ballet Royal’s Noces de Tétis (1655); and Vues de châteaux dedicated (1658) to Louis XIV. From 1662 he engraved plates for the King: Course de testes [têtes] et de bagues (1662); Plaisirs de l’isle enchantée (1664); and Châteaux royaux. He produced over 1000 pieces. His style was at first rather loose but from 1643 onwards became finer and more delicate and gained in accuracy, becoming precise without being dry; it was sometimes similar to that of Jacques Callot or Stefano della Bella, with whom he was on friendly terms. In 1661 he inherited Israël Henriet’s plates and republished engravings from them.

Israel SILVESTRE (Nancy, 1621 - Parigi, 1691).

Silvestre was a French family of artists. The engraver and draughtsman Israël Silvestre was a nephew of ISRAËL HENRIET. Most of Silvestre’s children became painters, draughtsmen or engravers. His son Louis de Silvestre (the younger) was a successful painter, who worked for the Saxon court from 1716 to 1748. Louis’s brother Charles-François Silvestre (b Paris, 10 April 1667; d Versailles, 8 Feb 1738) was a painter, draughtsman and engraver. Louis Silvestre (the elder) (b Paris, 20 March 1669; d Paris, 18 April 1740) was a painter and engraver, and both Alexandre Silvestre (b Paris, 26 Dec 1672) and Suzanne Silvestre (b Paris, 14 June 1694; d before 1738) were engravers. Suzanne married the sculptor Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne the elder. (b Nancy, 3 Aug 1621; d Paris, 11 Oct 1691). Engraver and draughtsman. About 1634 or 1635 he arrived in Paris, where his uncle Israël Henriet taught him to draw and engrave and published his prints. Between 1638 and 1641 Silvestre travelled in Italy; records show that he was there again c. 1643 and in 1653. After the second visit, his Vues d’Italie appeared, followed by Vues de Paris et des environs (1645); Ports de mer (1648); Paysages (1654); a second set of Vues d’Italie and prints of the Ballet Royal’s Noces de Tétis (1655); and Vues de châteaux dedicated (1658) to Louis XIV. From 1662 he engraved plates for the King: Course de testes [têtes] et de bagues (1662); Plaisirs de l’isle enchantée (1664); and Châteaux royaux. He produced over 1000 pieces. His style was at first rather loose but from 1643 onwards became finer and more delicate and gained in accuracy, becoming precise without being dry; it was sometimes similar to that of Jacques Callot or Stefano della Bella, with whom he was on friendly terms. In 1661 he inherited Israël Henriet’s plates and republished engravings from them.