Castello di St. Angelo

  • New
Reference: S41358
Author Willem II van NIEULANDT
Year: 1605 ca.
Measures: 278 x 225 mm
€1,100.00

  • New
Reference: S41358
Author Willem II van NIEULANDT
Year: 1605 ca.
Measures: 278 x 225 mm
€1,100.00

Description

A panoramic view of the Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome with the bridge seen to left, three figures seen from behind in central foreground.

Etching, circa 1605,  numbered 4 in top right. Lettered in margin below image with title.

This is the last of a series of four numbered plates showing Roman antiquities (Hollstein 6-9).  All four etchings are after drawings by Matthijs Bril, now in the Louvre.

Willem or Guiliam van Nieulandt, sometimes Terranova (1584–1635) was a painter, engraver, poet and playwright from Antwerp. Having spent some time in the studio run by Jacob Savery in Amsterdam, which was followed by a lengthy stay in Rome as an assistant to Paul Bril, the artist returned to his native Antwerp in about 1605. He became a member of the local Guild of St. Luke and was granted the freedom of the city not long afterwards. According to Willem Adriaan te Slaa, this set of Views of Rome is in all probability one of van Nieulandt’s earliest printed works, dating back at 1605.

A fine impression, printed on contemporary laid paper, trimmed to the borderline. In good condition.

Bibliografia

te Slaa, Willem Adriaan, Willem van Nieulandt II as Printmaker, in “Print Quarterly”, vol. 31, no. 4, 2014, pp. 379–94, Hollstein, Dutch and Flemish etchings, engravings and woodcuts c.1450-1700 (9.I).

Willem II van NIEULANDT (Anversa 1584 – Amsterdam 1635)

Willem or Guiliam van Nieulandt, sometimes Terranova (1584–1635) was a Dutch Golden Age painter, engraver, poet and playwright from Antwerp. His father Adrien van Nieulandt the elder was born to a family of artists of Flemish origin from Antwerp. He moved with his family to Amsterdam in 1589, after the Siege of Antwerp, probably because they were Protestants. His three sons Willem van Nieulandt II (named for his uncle, also a painter), Adriaen van Nieulandt the younger, and Jacob van Nieulandt all became painters. Having spent some time in the studio run by Jacob Savery in Amsterdam, which was followed by a lengthy stay in Rome as an assistant to Paul Bril, the artist returned to his native Antwerp in about 1605. He became a member of the local Guild of St. Luke and was granted the freedom of the city not long afterwards. In Spring 1606 the 22-year-old married Anna Hustaert in Amsterdam, but the couple settled in Antwerp. Nieulandt was better known as a poet and playwright than as a painter. He was a member of the Antwerp chamber of rhetoric the Olyftack (Olive Branch) from 1613 to 1621, transferring to the rival Violieren from 1621 to 1629. In May 1620 he won the prize for best poem at a rhetoric competition in Mechelen, writing under the pen name Dient uwen Al (Serve your All). In May 1624 the Violieren produced his play Aegyptica (a tragedy on the theme of Anthony and Cleopatra). His daughter Constantia, who later married Adriaen van Utrecht, was likewise a well regarded poet. At some point after May 1629 he returned to Amsterdam, where he lived until his death in 1635.

Willem II van NIEULANDT (Anversa 1584 – Amsterdam 1635)

Willem or Guiliam van Nieulandt, sometimes Terranova (1584–1635) was a Dutch Golden Age painter, engraver, poet and playwright from Antwerp. His father Adrien van Nieulandt the elder was born to a family of artists of Flemish origin from Antwerp. He moved with his family to Amsterdam in 1589, after the Siege of Antwerp, probably because they were Protestants. His three sons Willem van Nieulandt II (named for his uncle, also a painter), Adriaen van Nieulandt the younger, and Jacob van Nieulandt all became painters. Having spent some time in the studio run by Jacob Savery in Amsterdam, which was followed by a lengthy stay in Rome as an assistant to Paul Bril, the artist returned to his native Antwerp in about 1605. He became a member of the local Guild of St. Luke and was granted the freedom of the city not long afterwards. In Spring 1606 the 22-year-old married Anna Hustaert in Amsterdam, but the couple settled in Antwerp. Nieulandt was better known as a poet and playwright than as a painter. He was a member of the Antwerp chamber of rhetoric the Olyftack (Olive Branch) from 1613 to 1621, transferring to the rival Violieren from 1621 to 1629. In May 1620 he won the prize for best poem at a rhetoric competition in Mechelen, writing under the pen name Dient uwen Al (Serve your All). In May 1624 the Violieren produced his play Aegyptica (a tragedy on the theme of Anthony and Cleopatra). His daughter Constantia, who later married Adriaen van Utrecht, was likewise a well regarded poet. At some point after May 1629 he returned to Amsterdam, where he lived until his death in 1635.