Ferdinando I de' Medici examines the project for the restoration of Santa Maria del Fiore.

Reference: S42609
Author Jacques CALLOT
Year: 1615 ca.
Measures: 303 x 205 mm
Not Available

Reference: S42609
Author Jacques CALLOT
Year: 1615 ca.
Measures: 303 x 205 mm
Not Available

Description

Engraving, 1615 circa, unlettered.

Example in the first state, of two. Printed on contemporary laid paper, trimmed close to platemark, light scattered foxing, otherwise in good condition

A copy in reverse after a drawing by Matteo Rosselli 1578 – 1650) in Lille (Pl. 586; B. Brejon de Lavergnée, 'Catalogue des dessins italiens: collections du Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lille', Paris, 1997, n. 590).

 

From a set of 16 plates (plus two left unfinished) representing the main events of the reign of Ferdinand I de Medici, known as Life of Ferdinand I de' Medici (Lieure 147-162). The set was commissioned to Callot by the court of Florence on 23 October 1614, and the printing probably ended in 1620 (Meaume dates the set from 1616 while according to Lieure, Callot worked on it from 1615 to 1619-20).

Bibliografia: Lieure, 149.

Jacques CALLOT (Nancy 1592 - 1635)

He was a baroque graphics artist, draftsman and printmaker from the Duchy of Lorraine (an independant state on the North-Eastern border with France). He made etchings that chronicled the people and the life of his period (soldiers, clowns, drunkards, wanderers, beggars, and various outcasts). These images of people are often contrasted by spectacular landscapes (see, for instance, "The Temptation of St. Anthony"). His skill in shading and his use of different tones were remarkable for the period and he is often compared to Albrecht Dürer.

Jacques CALLOT (Nancy 1592 - 1635)

He was a baroque graphics artist, draftsman and printmaker from the Duchy of Lorraine (an independant state on the North-Eastern border with France). He made etchings that chronicled the people and the life of his period (soldiers, clowns, drunkards, wanderers, beggars, and various outcasts). These images of people are often contrasted by spectacular landscapes (see, for instance, "The Temptation of St. Anthony"). His skill in shading and his use of different tones were remarkable for the period and he is often compared to Albrecht Dürer.